Twitter launches “Twitter Offers”, A Way to Drive Social Media Traffic Offline

Twitter seems bullish about its place in the omnichannel retail arena. After hiring Nathan Hubbard, former Ticketmaster president, the company started seriously developing ecommerce features for its users.

It all started with rumors leaked online about Twitter dipping its toes in ecommerce. The news were soon followed by a “buy now” button tested for a while and a few months back the “#AmazonCart” partnership was announced. The Amazon Cart project allowed customers to add Amazon products to their carts by linking their accounts and adding them to their carts via Twitter.

Twitter now launched Twitter Offers, a way for advertisers to drive social media traffic directly to brick and mortar stores. The process is pretty straight forward or Twitter users: they link their credit cards to Twitter, claim rewards from advertisers and then redeem said offers in store.

Twitter offers
Twitter offers

As it seems Twitter sees commerce not just online but offline as well. The vision includes online and offline shopping, social media, Amazon accounts linked to Twitter and … payments.

Long story short: everything Twitter has done so far is outlining a strategy where the company targets more than social media. It’s targeting omnichannel retail as a way to increase its revenue. It has the user base and it’s building the payment infrastructure. Its focus and drive may lead it where Facebook failed – setting foot in commerce land.

 

Tweet to Buy From Amazon. #AmazonCart – a Partnership Between Amazon and Twitter.

amazon-twitter-cartTwitter keeps getting closer to social commerce. The social network just announced a partnership with Amazon where users can add products to their Amazon cart with a tweet.

The process is fairly simple. Amazon customers who are also Twitter users can add products by following three simple steps:

  1. Connect their Amazon and Twitter account
  2. Watch for tweets containing an Amazon link
  3. Reply to above mentioned tweets and adding “#AmazonCart”

After users follow through these steps products are automatically added to their Amazon Cart and they can buy later. If Twitter users didn’t connect the accounts or the service is not yet available in their area, they get an automated message from @MyAmazon guiding them to a specific Amazon web page describing the service:

amazon-twitter-cart-not-working

Most avid users – the Amazon affiliates

tweets-amazoncartAfter quickly connecting my accounts I was expecting to see a public stream of Amazon shoppers announcing their purchases.

Not even close. Right now most of those tweeting the hashtag are Amazon Affiliates asking their followers to reply to tweets containing  their affiliate links.

Apparently this is somewhat of a feature, as Julie Law, Amazon spokeswoman states: We have a significant number of customers who use Twitter, and a significant number of affiliates who use Twitter, too.

Twitter is serious about eCommerce

The #AmazonCart partnership is probably just a first step for the two companies. Amazon is interested in social commerce and as Facebook is probably harder to steer, Twitter seems the right choice.

Twitter on the other hand, showed interest in developing ecommerce abilities by hiring ex Ticketmaster CEO Nathan Hubbard. Moreover, this year information was leaked about a potential partnership with Fancy.com and mobile payments company Stripe, involving a three way solution allowing Twitter to leverage potential customers.

Twitter-commerce is in the Making. And it Looks Great.

It seems that Twitter is moving forward with its plans to enter the ecommerce market. Last year the company hired Nathan Hubbard, former Ticketmaster CEO and ecommerce heavyweight, to handle ecommerce development efforts.

News about Twitter Commerce have now surfaced, showing a potential user flow for customers buying directly from Twitter.

The company has partnered with Fancy.com (online catalogue / Pinterest for buyers) AND Stripe (web and mobile payments) to provide merchants with the option to sell on its social network. The link between Twitter and Fancy is obviously Mr. Jack Dorsey, Twitter (somehow) co-founder and member of the board for Fancy.com.

Twitter commerce user flow found on Fancy.com

Twitter commerce - Source: Re/Code.net
Twitter commerce – Source: Re/Code.net

Re/Code “found” some “documents on fancy.com, in a “unprotected” area. Italics mark some obvious skepticism with “finding the documents” (what- did they just type fancy.com/twitter-commerce?) .

Whereas the documents and their source is of little importance, the fact is the user flow looks great and seems beautifully integrated with Twitter. It even provides a package tracking app and same-day delivery options.

Unlike Twitter, Facebook notoriously killed the much-awaited f-commerce by ignoring the growing ecommerce trend and its own potential opportunities. Much more –  it then decreased organic reach through its platform for non paying customers, thus alienating potential f-commerce merchants.

Now that the playing field is leveled, Twitter may somehow turn out to be a spectacular and unexpected challenger to eBay and Amazon. It does have 645 million potential customers.

Twitter Starts Developing Commerce Operations. Hires Ticketmaster CEO to Lead Commerce Efforts

Twitter has recently hired Nathan Hubbard, former Ticketmaster president, to lead the charge on its commerce operations. This move is a part of Twitter’s efforts to pass the $1 billion revenue threshold by 2014. With its current revenues coming almost exclusively from advertising, Twitter figured it can unlock its social commerce potential, a market that is still untapped by most social networks.

Twitter's new Head of Commerce - Nathan Hubbard
Twitter’s new Head of Commerce – Nathan Hubbard

While Twitter’s intention is not exactly disruptive or unexpected, it is interesting to have a look at some of the subtle nuances. Hubbard recently declared in an interview that…

“We’re going to go to people who have stuff to sell and help them use Twitter to sell it more effectively. One of the hallmarks of Twitter’s entire approach has been partnering. We’re going to take the same approach with owners of physical and digital goods.

– Nathan Hubbard

Taking into account Hubbard’s words and the recent developments in social media and eCommerce some things are to be expected:

  1. It’s really important to note that Twitter’s efforts seem to be going into C2C territory, as well as the traditional approach into B2C. Twitter’s users may be empowered to exchange and trade stuff on the social network, an activity that is not that uncommon on its main competitor platform, Facebook. That may mean that Twitter’s commerce innovation will be to help transform its social network by adding a C2C commerce layer, not unlike Ebay’s platform. It does have the users, it might just as well let them trade.
  2. There seems to be a great focus on digital goods, as they may work better with the digital market Twitter is building. Some of Facebook’s best commerce results came from digital content, such as apps, especially Mobile App Install Ads. The Install Ads have helped Facebook increase its share of mobile – related revenue to 41% of total. But digital products is a far larger market than apps. It goes beyond to include concert tickets, airline reservations, hotel reservations, digital books and many others.
  3. You might have noticed that Twitter left the “e” out of its “eCommerce” operations as the company has a Commerce target. Both online and offline. A multichannel approach, if you will. As the lines between traditional and online retail have become almost invisible in the past years, Twitter seems to be looking into an integrated commerce approach, tracking and targeting the potential consumer via brick and mortar stores, as well as online. To help deliver metrics on such efforts, the company recently paid $90 million for Bluefin, a social and TV advertising metrics company.

 

There is a high chance that Twitter’s commerce efforts might not be all that spectacular, as even the mighty Facebook seems to be running around in circles when it comes to commerce, but I am personally looking forward to see where their efforts take them.