Is Mobile Commerce Taking Over Ecommerce?

A chart based on US Census Bureau and Comscore data was published by Business Insider. It shows Mobile Commerce growing three times faster than Ecommerce overall.

Is Mobile Commerce taking on "classic" Ecommerce?
Is Mobile Commerce taking on “classic” Ecommerce? Source.

The numbers behind it are very interesting:

  1. mobile commerce is on the rise and has registered a 48% YoY growth, in the second quarter. It now accounts for $8 billion in online spending.
  2. overall ecommerce (including mobile commerce) grew “only” 15.9% year over year in the second quarter and totals $70.1 billion in online sales.

However…

Stop betting on (just) mobile. We’re not there yet.

Smartphones and tablets have brought forth a revolution in computing and social interaction. Unfortunately for overenthusiastic mobile-only fans, mcommerce usage is lagging behind mobile device adoption.

If you look at the chart above you’ll see there’s a  linear growth in mobile commerce. Not a hockey puck growth. Not even an accelerated growth.

Even more – ecommerce accounts for only 5.9% of all retail. Mobile commerce itself is just 11.4% of ecommerce. This means mobile commerce, however ambitious is pretty much insignifiant. It accounts for just 0.67% of total US retail.

Smartphones and tablets are extremely popular. Mobile commerce – not so much.

And hey – it’s not the fact that people don’t like smartphones. Oh no. People love smartphones:

Growth in smartphone penetration in the US.
Growth in smartphone penetration in the US. Source.

 

 

They also love tablets. Almost 42% of all US adults own at least a tablet. Remember – this is a product that went on sale only 4 years ago, when Apple introduced the iPad. In just 4 short years, the tablet has become a virtually ubiquitous computing item for US adults.

Tablet penetration among US adults. Source.
Tablet penetration among US adults. Source.

So – people are buying mobile devices like crazy. PC sales are dropping yet the mobile commerce is just 0.67% .Why?

The short answer – there is no mobile commerce. 

Mobile is the bridge. It helps connect the physical world to the virtual world. The act of purchasing happens on multiple channels. Mobile is not “the future”. It is the present yet the present comes in a form we have not met before – a bridge across channels.

If we take the time to see matters from the consumer’s point of view things are not as black and white as we expect them to be. Few if any consumers think in terms of mobile OR desktop OR brick and mortar. The consumer will spend time in a B&M store, browse the web to search for the right products, do a little showrooming to find the be best pricing. In the end, the whole purchasing experience stretches across channels and some are more popular than others.

But the customer has only one perspective where channels blend in. The omnichannel perspective. To provide the ecosystem for this perspective, the new retailers will try to understand and implement omnichannel retail because mobile, however massive, is just a piece of the puzzle.

There’s no Place Like 127.0.0.1

When it comes to computers, 127.0.0.1 is the “localhost”. In computer networking the local host is “this computer”. Or home. We have a changing landscape in computer usage (shift to mobile) and we notice the same trend in human behavior. People change places more than before. Decreased cost in transportation and relocation means we can move from one place to another without much hassle.

Our home when we're away
Our home when we’re away

But there is no place like home, right? Well – what is home? Apparently our digital hubs have become our homes when we are on the move. Social networks are now our go-to place when we want to connect with our friends, even when we are away. Photo sharing apps like Instagram or Flickr store our memories and we can access them on the fly whenever we are away.

Even our local shop gets replaced by the increasingly present favorite online shop brand. There is a pattern that shows mobile buyers (those that change residential areas) are more prone to purchasing online and staying loyal to their favorite online store brand:

“For example, customers at Diapers.com who change locations become more or less likely to shop online, depending on the increase or decrease in their offline shopping costs in their new neighborhoods. Specifically, shoppers who have some experience shopping online and then move to a new location with homes with more storage capacity and relatively few stores will increase their online shopping activity.” Source: MIT Sloan Review

We, human beings, do not enjoy change all that much. In a fast moving world – we need stability. We need a fixed point. And after all it is all relative. If we’re constantly on the move – the only fixed point is that which moves with us or is everywhere around. Brick and mortar stores are fixed and therefore always moving for the traveler. Our fixed point is in the cloud. Our fixed point is the mobile.