Top 5 Alternatives to Google Analytics, for Ecommerce

Say you’re running an online store. Chances are you are using or plan on using Google Analytics. It’s free, it’s popular and there are tons of info out there to help you get started and optimize your sales stream.

But there are downsides too. First one – Google already knows a lot about you and your customers. You might want to keep some things discreet, right?

Second – Google Analytics is an one-size-fits-all type of product. Sure, it has plenty of features but chances are you’re likely to get lost in some of those features. Even if you don’t get lost, you’re likely to spend a lot of time digging through somewhat useless data, while at the same time, missing out on very important bits of information.

Third – real time reporting is pretty limited, if you’re running the free version. Once you get over 10 million views you’ll have to switch to the paid version, costing you north of $150 000. But then you can also try some more advanced reporting tools.

Of course, there are plenty of traffic analytics tools out there. Some have really great interfaces and features. But as an online shop owner or manager, you have to look at what works best for your store. Have a look below:

1. Mixpanel

Mixpanel Funels
Mixpanel Funnels

Mixpanel is great choice for small and mid-sized business that sell. Whether we’re talking about an online retailer, a hotel selling reservations or an iPhone game developer selling game upgrades – it is a great tool.

Even the way Mixpanel tracks actions and charges users is a great fit for online retailers. Ecommerce sites don’t really need too much intel on page views. What really matter are actions – the number of times sometimes has clicked the “buy” button, the number of times users download a brochure or the number of Google Ad visitors that turn into customers.

Mixpanel calls these actions data points, and this is a great news for startups and mid-sized businesses.

It’s tailored around five basic functions:

  1. Segmentation – allows for better understanding of user behavior and splits user groups according to actions.
  2. Funnels – you might be familiar with funnels from GA. But once you get to know Mixpanel’s take on the funnels, it seems that something has dramatically changed. Funnels can be added on the fly and viewed retroactively, easily.
  3. Retention – it’s not just how much you sell, but also – who keeps coming back.
  4. People – unlike GA’s confusing take on users, Mixpanel builds profiles ecommerce store owners can understand. The system collects data that can be browsed individually or segmented. One great feature is the notifications option, where you can mail, send SMS or push notifications to users, based on automated or manually segmented profiles.
  5. Notifications – mentioned above, it is a great tool that improves the analytics platform, allowing you to also communicate directly to consumers.

Pricing

Pricing is free for less than 25 000 data points and it can go up to $2000 / month, for companies with more than 20 million data points.

 

2. GoSquared

The redesigned GoSquared app
The redesigned GoSquared app

GoSquared is a great piece of engineering and with its redesigned interface – easy to use. It serves over 40k businesses and it has a special area developed strictly for ecommerce owners.

When it comes to ecommerce, GoSquared packs a lot of power in a simple interface. Just like most other applications on this list, it puts a strong emphasis on the targeting users as potential customers and tracking their actions and behavior.

The Metrics work toward providing clear insights on how revenue is doing. The analytics tool provides info on social media influence on sales and data on best performing products.

One really useful set of tools is what GoSquared calls Predictive Analytics. Previously discussed on Netonomy.NET, predictive analytics can mix past and present data to determine possible outcomes in the future. It can be used to predict traffic, sales or best selling products, to name a few.

GoSquared also mentions their ability to send Differentiated Reports, based on specific team member’s needs. One for the CEO, one for the marketing team, one for the … well, you get the idea.

But if there is something that really sets GoSquared apart – this is the Developer API. Using this, developers can build truly dynamic online stores, that respond to customer behavior and profile. From info on previous purchases, location, language and others, online stores can be set to respond to specific customer needs.

Pricing

Pricing can be configured here and starts at $32 / mo for 100k pageviews and 100 transactions. It can go north of $640 / mo for more than 10 million pageviews and more than 10k transactions. You can test the application in a 14 days trial.

 

3. FoxMetrics

analytics-foxmetrics

Foxmetrics has some nifty features when it comes to ecommerce and online retail related options. It is light and easy to set up, it works on both web and the mobile and it is focused on helping you increase conversions.

Although Foxmetrics is not 100% focused on ecommerce related (they also provide support for online publishers), it does have some great features you can use:

  1. People – using this section you can understand customers and their actions and can sync this data into company CRM software;
  2. Ecommerce – Foxmetrics provides support for useful KPI’s and advanced reporting dashboards. Using customer data, it can build  product relationships, shopping cart reports and can respond with automated actions;
  3. Subscription is an useful tool for companies working with periodic purchases. The product can report user data, conversion and churn rate, as well as detailed info on separate plans;
  4. The Marketing and Triggers options allow for personalized marketing and response, based on referral and user actions.

Pricing

Although Foxmetrics does not provide a free option, it does provide a 14 day trial to test the features. Plans range from $50 to $120 per month and beyond, for enterprise users. However, as an ecommerce user, you’ll be stuck with the $120 plan.

 

4. Woopra

analytics-woopra

Woopra  is a great way to understand your customer and their history browsing your store. You’ll be able to get behavioral insights from customers, run advanced or preset analytics reports.

By tapping into Woopra’s Funnel reporting section you can discover bottlenecks in the conversion path.

The product also promises a good segmentation on best performing customer groups and even build segments based on funnels.

Pricing

The pricing starts with a free version that allows 30 000 actions (similar to Mixpanel’s data points). The small business plans range between $79.95 and $1199.95/mo.

 

5. KISSMetrics

analytics-kissmetrics

KISSmetrics follows a simple assumption: you must get to know your users … ahem … customers. That and the fact you should pay attention to their brand name.

The promise KISSmetrics makes is that all your data will be connected to real people, with real actions. Once setup, you can see where people are, what and why they buy your products and in some unfortunate cases, why they don’t.

Features include funnels, cohorts (groups with similar interests), revenue in real time and the metrics you’re familiar from GA. The things that really set the product apart is the data export feature for further analysis and its A/B testing options, both a great fit for customer profiling.

Pricing

Pricing for the KISSmetrics product starts at $150/mo for up to 500 000 events and goes up to $500/mo, when your webstore reaches more than 1 million events. Once you pass the upper threshold, just like all others, you get to negotiate your pricing.

 

4 Easy Ways to Better Understand Your Online Customers

understandingAdvances in technology have been revolutionizing the way businesses are conducted. They are also reshaping the landscape on how companies interact with customers. This is a phenomenon that is clearly observed in e-commerce. E-commerce is not only reducing costs but is also increasing efficiency and expanding possible revenues.

Because the Internet is facilitating interaction, it is now possible to instantly and easily understand online customers. A business need not spend much on doing traditional market research. Here are four easy, fast, and less costly ways to better understand the thoughts, behavior, and attitude of online consumers.

  1. Conduct or check out surveys.

Online surveys or polls are designed to determine thoughts and behaviors of online customers. There are many of such studies that cover your sector or industry. If you prefer results and findings that are more specific to your business, you may commission or conduct the surveys. It can be as simple as asking your customers to fill out simple survey forms online. You may also use the free online survey services that are available across the Internet. Survey results can give you an idea of how your online customers think and feel about your business.

  1. Use Web analytics tools.

To date, there are various Web analytics tools that facilitate better understanding of online consumers. The most common are analytics about specific keywords of key phrases that are most commonly used by consumers when using search engines for finding information or products they need. You can use the information to optimize the content of your own online site so that you can take advantage of opportunities brought about by higher search engine rankings.

  1. Check out customers’ testimonials.

You can find out how consumers think about products and services. Testimonials posted by businesses through their own sites may not be reliable as those could be biased. The best and most credible testimonials come from actual consumers who ventilate and air their rants and raves through online forums, discussion boards, and reviews. Check those out to find consumers’ actual opinions about businesses and products.

  1. Test the market.

This option can be quite risky and costly. It is advisable to check out the first three ways enumerated before finally testing the market. You may launch a small-scale product or service launch to determine if online consumers are really ready and are open to try out innovations and new offerings. Actual sales can be the best indication of what consumers really think. Testing the market can lead to two types of decisions: first to pursue or go on with your business activity and second, to stop what you are doing because the market is not yet receptive.

Author: Richard Fisher

About the author:

Richard has been involved in the online marketing industry for several years. After spending time working on user experience optimisation, Richard is now a strategist at Infinity Technologies, one of Australia’s leading ecommerce digital agency.