The Omnichannel Supply Chain

For a very long time, retailers used a linear approach to the supply chain. It meant that merchandise flowed in just one direction. Products would move between the manufacturer, the wholesaler, the retailer and onto the sales channel. This sales channel meant the brick and mortar store, in all its variations, for a very long time.

With the internet revolution came the concept of eCommerce, where customers would place the orders on an internet store front and they would receive it at home. Medium and large retailers used the same method of silo-management to the online store.

The “silo” approach meant that each new sales channel would be treated as a separate silo, independent from the other stores. That worked for the previous concept of brick and mortar stores, so it had to work for the ecommerce approach, too, right?

Not quite. The concept of having an online store work as a separate operation doesn’t fit the profile for the new consumer. The fact is that there are very few exclusive online shoppers. People like to spend time in stores, touching merchandise, they spend time on social media, get informed, place calls to ask for info and generally live in a complex world that mixes online and offline experiences.

Customers demand new options from retailers, things such as “buy online, pick-up in store”, “order in store, receive at home” – just some of the many challenges retailers face right now, trying to connect with the new consumer.

To go from being a retailer to being an omnichannel retailer, companies need to step up their game. And it’s not just marketing or hardly operational shopping programs. Customers demand a real change in the way they are engaged. Companies such as Macy’s have invested in creating experiences that handle multiple journey maps for their customers and the results are satisfying.

To achieve this, retailers need to adopt an omnichannel supply chain. The biggest difference between this type of approach and the previous is the fact that it is omni-directional. Whereas the classic supply chain was mostly linear, flowing from one place (manufacturer) to the other (customer), the omnichannel supply chain flows across many boundaries.

To achieve relevance in the omnichannel age, retailers need to be ready to handle:

  • cross-channel inventory transparency
  • a multitude of customer journeys (ex.: customer places a call in the call center, gets informed, places the order online, picks and pays for the order in a brick and mortar store)
  • new manufacturing demands and technologies (mass-customized merchandise, 3D printing, work in process real-time information)
  • information flow within the company and outside the company (with wholesale partners or manufacturers)

The omnichannel supply chain is not easy to achieve. Medium and large companies are caught up in a web of systems and processes that may have worked 10 or 20 years ago but they are now obsolete. The linear approach to supply chain management and marketing is really not their best bet. The change in consumer behavior is irreversible and the omnichannel supply chain is one of the most important changes in today’s retail.

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