Ebay and PayPal Splitting. Why is This a Good Thing?

Ebay and PayPal have been together since 2002, when Ebay decided to acquire PayPal for $1.5 billion. At that moment both companies were heavy weights in their respective fields and growth was booming. Ebay struggled with a previous solution, called Billpoint, until deciding to give in and purchase PayPal.

eBay-and-PayPalSince then, both gained a lot from the other. Ebay benefited from PayPal’s ease of use and helped its customers send money to one another. This helped streamline and secure the purchase process, thus increasing transactions. PayPal, one the other hand, piggy backed on Ebay’s massive user base and international exposure. Its revenue increased by the year and in the second quarter of 2014, it amounted to 45% of Ebay Inc’s total revenue.

The fast growth of PayPal, as well the whole “payments revolution” potential lead Carl Icahn to propose a split between Ebay and PayPal this year. Icahn’s proposal / attack was then fended off by Ebay CEO John Donahoe and PayPal ex-leader David Marcus. Since february 2014, a lot of things happened. David Marcus left the company to join Facebook and biggest of the biggest, tech mammoth Apple launched the Apple Pay. What seemed like a closed case soon turned into a huge split between the companies.

Now – John Donahoe will still run Ebay Inc until the split is official. As of that moment he will step down as CEO and Ebay will be lead by Devin Wenig, now president of eBay Marketplaces. PayPal will split into a new company, directed by Dan Schulman, now president at American Express, Enterprise Growth Group.

PayPal benefits from Ebay Inc. spliting. The split means that PayPal will be able to roam free, grow and develop independently. On the other hand Ebay will be able to … well … do everything it was doing before. The marketplace division is not gaining much from the split. It loses a revenue stream, its shares will drop and it will have to find a new way to keep up with its growth in the future.

However PayPal needs independence to keep up with increasing competition in the omnichannel payments landscape. It needs to innovate, it has to connect online and offline and it has to do a bit better on mobile devices. The split will help the company evolve and here are three reasons why:

1. PayPal can mean more than just payments

Banking as we know is shifting from an old, rigid system to a new way of doing business. That means more than wiring money. It means deposits, it means financing, it means Peer 2 Peer Lending and more. Under Ebay, PayPal was bound to stick to payments and money transfers. Now that Ebay is no longer the umbrella that fosters PayPal innovation, we may soon see more financial goodies from PayPal.

2. PayPal should be more than an accessory to Ebay

Elon Musk explained best why Ebay should not hold PayPal back: “It doesn’t make sense that a global payment system is a subsidiary of an auction website… It’s as if Target owned Visa or something”.

The fact is PayPal outgrows Ebay. It can and should be a global financial company, a field that’s obviously larger than Ebay’s marketplaces can ever be.

3. PayPal could grow even faster as a separately traded company

It’s no secret that Ebay has already done what it could to help PayPal. Now it’s just living off PayPal’s growth. As a separately traded company PayPal can become a larger company, more attractive to investors, which in turn can help the company finance its expansion, growth and fight against Apple, Google, Amazon and even AliBaba.

But …

Carl Icahn is known as a corporate raider and maybe there’s more to this story than meets the eye. There is a possibility that he and others are just splitting the company to later organize a take over from companies such as Visa, MasterCard or one of the larger banks. What could be a profitable short-term strategy could hurt PayPal in the long run and kill one of the most promising financial companies in the world.

What does Apple Pay mean for Retailers?

Apple announced its newest products and everybody focused on the much awaited iWatch or the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. The real news, however, both business-wise and from a consumer point of view is the launch of Apple Pay, an NFC (Near Field Communications) ready payment system. Simply put, Apple’s payment system allows customers to store credit card data on their iPhones and when the time comes, just tap to pay.

apple-paymentThe product launch was not unexpected. With the previous operating system launch, Apple packed several features that would allow for better mobile commerce. The iCloud Keychain was introduced to Safari in order to allow both faster logins to known websites as well as, in the future, a faster checkout.

With Apple Pay, the Cupertino company joins the omnichannel payment war as was predicted in this previous post. Google, Amazon, Ebay (through PayPal), AliBaba and even Facebook are trying to get a piece of the $15 trillion payments market. As banks and established financial institutions have failed to meet customer expectations in mobile payments, the gap between needs and available options will probably be filled by one of the tech titans.

Google tried its luck with the Google Wallet, Ebay’s PayPal is now crossing the bridge into offline teritorry and Facebook recruited Paypal’s former CEO David Marcus.  Marcus is the man that helped Paypal grow from $750 million in 2010 to $27 billion in 2013, so one can only assume Facebook is also serious about payments.

To help the product take off, Apple signed 220 000 merchants onboard its Apple Pay project. Among them: Mc Donald’s, Babies R Us, Macy’s, Staples, Sephora and of course, all Apple retail stores. The 220 k merchants are just 2.4% of the total 7 to 9 million merchants in the US but it is a great start given the fact that Apple has a habit on pulling seemingly impossible feats, starting with close to nothing.

For example the iTunes Store launched with not more than 200 000 songs and only Mac Users could move the purchased songs to their iPods By September 2012, it was home to more than 37 million songs, 700,000 apps, 190,000 TV episodes and 45,000 films. By February 2013, the iTunes store had sold more than 25 billion songs worldwide.

So yes, there is a pattern here and there is probably a whole lot of room for improvement in the payments area.

Apple Pay’s security

Although recent iCloud security issues clouded the product launch, the security behind the payment technology looks great. First of all it allows customers to save credit card data on their phone without exposing sensible details to potential hackers. It also features the Touch ID identification technique where users sign payments with their biometric input (the fingerprint).

The credit card information is not beemed online but rather stored in a special chip, on the iPhone, a hardware – software combination that Apple named Secure Element. When a transaction is processed, credit card details are not sent to Apple’s servers and the retailer can’t see the data. Instead, a proxy account number is issued that the retailers charges. Each transaction is secured by an unique security code that authenticates it. Apple has laid more layers of security then we came to expect and that should work just great. But take it with a pinch of salt because everything is secure untill it is not anymore.

The company states that it does not store transaction data regarding location, products purchased or the amount the customer has spent. That certainly leaves room to question why exactly would Apple choose not to store these valuable data. The answer lies with data from Bloomberg sources. According to these anonymous sources, Apple has partnered with banks in the system to receive a percentage from each transaction.

The banks involved are JP Morgan Chase & Co, Bank of America and Citigroup Inc. They agreed to integrate their cards into the system and alongside came three of the biggest card networks – Visa Inc., Mastercard Inc. And American Express Co.

So we have a great lineup for Apply Pay and although NFC payments where slow to take off, it seems that Apple’s incredible effort to bring every important player on board will be the push mobile payments needs right now.

As the company promissed it won’t charge users, merchants or developers, one of the biggest issues (the cost issue) seems to be out of the way. With customers using their mobiles more and more, retailers will be forced to adopt some form of omnichannel payment system.

How does Apple Pay benefit retailers?

Retailers and merchants in general receive several incentives to adopt NFC payment compliant technology.

First of all, the Apple Pay system allows a greater connectivity between online and offline sales channels. Customers can order products on the web store, in the brick and mortar stores or within a mobile app. The security and speed allow for greater ease of use.

The second big advantage is payment speed. By just tapping the phone, customers can pay within a 10 second timeframe, improving sales speed. This allows merchants to move customers through almost instantly.

Third big advantage Apple brings is an improvement in mobile purchases and payments. Although customers are so far browsing for products, they rather pay on the web store or order and pick up in a physical store. The biggest bottleneck is the mobile payment experience, one that is just awful for most retailers.

Famously Amazon has solved this issue with its One-Click Payments, where registered customers can use previously stored credit card data to move as fast as possible through the checkout process. Amazon’s patent sits at the heart of Apple’s payment system within iTunes, an extraordinarely usable example of mobile payments.

Actually that’s one of Apple’s strong points when implementing Apple Pay. The company will leverage almost 800 million iTunes accounts, most of them having their cards linked to the account. The magic of paying with a tap will now probably become mainstream.

Omnichannel Payments – Battle Between Giants

What comes to mind when you think digital payments? That would probably be PayPal. We all know Ebay subsidiary PayPal leads the game in digital Payments but now the game is set to change.

Paypal bets big on POS integration

Paypal bets big on POS integration

Although it does have the first mover advantage and has been going strong into omnichannel retail, PayPal is threatened by the largest tech companies in the world:

  1. First of all, company president David Marcus has resigned (or has been fired as rumor has it) to join Facebook. His mission – building a new type of … messaging tool. And by that I mean Facebook Payments.
  2. Google is pushing hard on its Google Wallet, a mobile bridge between online and offline sales. It is a fully NFC compatible payment system, which now accepts all major credit and debit cards, loyalty cards and discount cards. It also allows customers to save offers and buy using touch-to-pay systems.
  3. Everyone raved about the Amazon phone but the actual big news is … Amazon Payments. With over 200 million credit cards stored and the ability to pay with one click (for a very long time Amazon held the patent on that), Amazon is probably the biggest competitor to Ebay’s PayPal.
  4. Apple also has a huge database of credit cards stored on its server. It also has a massive database of customer options, customer history and a fully featured Keychain app built into Safari, ready to help customers do a quick checkout. Its wide device adoption allows it to become one of the most important players in the omnichannel payments area.
  5. Let’s not forget Ali Baba Group, the organization that controls over 84% of the fastest growing and biggest ecommerce market: China. AliPay is the group’s payment system, fully featured with the Yue Bao savings account. And now the company is set to have its IPO in the US.

Now this is the real Game of Thrones in the omnichannel world. Five tech monarchies are reaching for our wallets.

 

 

PayPal to Process More Offline Payments

Ebay subsidiary PayPal is dead serious about taking on a $10 trillion market: the Multichannel Payments Market. To do so it will have to prove its worthiness against older companies, especially in offline commerce.

Multichannel Payments

A steady increase in Ebay's Revenue. Biggest cash cow - PayPal, 41% of total revenue.

A steady increase in Ebay’s revenue. Biggest cash cow – PayPal, 41% of total revenue.

With more than 140 million registered users already, PayPal has the sweetest spot in the online payments today. Its acquisition of global payments company Braintree secured an additional 35 million registered users. As President David Marcus puts it – this is a part of an effort to redefine money and payments into what he calls “Money 3.0″ – a new way of looking at payments and how customers use them.

PayPal owner-company Ebay is at the front of what some would call a commerce revolution led by technology. Its three main branches (The Marketplaces, Ebay Enterprise and PayPal) all work together in this changing landscape.

The Marketplaces (including Ebay.com, Shopping.com and Rent.com) enable C2C Commerce, while Ebay Enterprise caters end-to-end multichannel commerce technology. Ebay Enterprise is the tech, operational management and marketing vendor for the likes of Toys’R’Us, Radioshack, Sony ant many others.

Between these two, the payment processing subsidiary PayPal leads the way in online payments. The company is Ebay’s most promising subsidiary, growing at 20% in 2013. As of 2011, it decided to go offline, allowing customers to handle their money, cards and PayPal wallets in one place.

POS solutions

paypalofflineTo increase offline usage, PayPal now offers point-of-sale solutions, mostly targeted at the new tablet-based counters. Store owners can easily implement its apps and start charging right away.

In an effort to increase adoption, PayPal started integration with third-party store management solutions such as ShopKeep POS, Booker, or Leapset.

Among its benefits for store-owners, Paypal lists security, quick implementation and an all-in-one approach to accepting payments, scanning barcodes, tracking inventory and sending invoices.

Customers willing to take their PayPal Wallet to an offline store account can pay by swiping their PayPal paycard, using their account or by paying online and picking up in store. Having a larger pool of companies accepting PayPal payments allows the company to securely handle all transactions, allow customers to receive loyalty points and handle all personal information.

Ebay and PayPal will stick together

paypal-growthSince Ebay purchased PayPal, both companies listed a successful increase in revenue. Ebay powered PayPal’s adoption to its marketplace users and in turn PayPal grew up to become one of Ebay’s most profitable subsidiaries, amounting to 41% of total revenue in 2013.

With the help from Ebay, PayPal grew from $600 million in mobile payments to $27 billion in just three years. The figures are posted on the 2014 annual shareholder meeting website, in response to Carl Icahn’s demand to spin PayPal off into a separate company.

Carl Icahn, one of the most notorious corporate raiders in the tech industry, demanded PayPal to be split into a separate company and become listed on its on. The board of directors fought his demands showing that even though the company is open to changes in the future, right now the two are working better together.

Luck would have it that shareholders reached an agreement to keep the companies together and handle the incoming commerce revolution as a whole.

“[...] we have moved aggressively to leverage PayPal’s integration with eBay to expand PayPal’s reach to millions of online retailers and to offline transactions. PayPal remains one of the fastest growing elements of the company – which helps explain why others are targeting the payments business but are far behind PayPal.”

John Donahue, Ebay CEO. Source.