There’s no Place Like 127.0.0.1

When it comes to computers, 127.0.0.1 is the “localhost”. In computer networking the local host is “this computer”. Or home. We have a changing landscape in computer usage (shift to mobile) and we notice the same trend in human behavior. People change places more than before. Decreased cost in transportation and relocation means we can move from one place to another without much hassle.

Our home when we're away

Our home when we’re away

But there is no place like home, right? Well – what is home? Apparently our digital hubs have become our homes when we are on the move. Social networks are now our go-to place when we want to connect with our friends, even when we are away. Photo sharing apps like Instagram or Flickr store our memories and we can access them on the fly whenever we are away.

Even our local shop gets replaced by the increasingly present favorite online shop brand. There is a pattern that shows mobile buyers (those that change residential areas) are more prone to purchasing online and staying loyal to their favorite online store brand:

“For example, customers at Diapers.com who change locations become more or less likely to shop online, depending on the increase or decrease in their offline shopping costs in their new neighborhoods. Specifically, shoppers who have some experience shopping online and then move to a new location with homes with more storage capacity and relatively few stores will increase their online shopping activity.” Source: MIT Sloan Review

We, human beings, do not enjoy change all that much. In a fast moving world – we need stability. We need a fixed point. And after all it is all relative. If we’re constantly on the move – the only fixed point is that which moves with us or is everywhere around. Brick and mortar stores are fixed and therefore always moving for the traveler. Our fixed point is in the cloud. Our fixed point is the mobile.

Tweet to Buy From Amazon. #AmazonCart – a Partnership Between Amazon and Twitter.

amazon-twitter-cartTwitter keeps getting closer to social commerce. The social network just announced a partnership with Amazon where users can add products to their Amazon cart with a tweet.

The process is fairly simple. Amazon customers who are also Twitter users can add products by following three simple steps:

  1. Connect their Amazon and Twitter account
  2. Watch for tweets containing an Amazon link
  3. Reply to above mentioned tweets and adding “#AmazonCart”

After users follow through these steps products are automatically added to their Amazon Cart and they can buy later. If Twitter users didn’t connect the accounts or the service is not yet available in their area, they get an automated message from @MyAmazon guiding them to a specific Amazon web page describing the service:

amazon-twitter-cart-not-working

Most avid users – the Amazon affiliates

tweets-amazoncartAfter quickly connecting my accounts I was expecting to see a public stream of Amazon shoppers announcing their purchases.

Not even close. Right now most of those tweeting the hashtag are Amazon Affiliates asking their followers to reply to tweets containing  their affiliate links.

Apparently this is somewhat of a feature, as Julie Law, Amazon spokeswoman states: We have a significant number of customers who use Twitter, and a significant number of affiliates who use Twitter, too.

Twitter is serious about eCommerce

The #AmazonCart partnership is probably just a first step for the two companies. Amazon is interested in social commerce and as Facebook is probably harder to steer, Twitter seems the right choice.

Twitter on the other hand, showed interest in developing ecommerce abilities by hiring ex Ticketmaster CEO Nathan Hubbard. Moreover, this year information was leaked about a potential partnership with Fancy.com and mobile payments company Stripe, involving a three way solution allowing Twitter to leverage potential customers.

Twitter-commerce is in the Making. And it Looks Great.

It seems that Twitter is moving forward with its plans to enter the ecommerce market. Last year the company hired Nathan Hubbard, former Ticketmaster CEO and ecommerce heavyweight, to handle ecommerce development efforts.

News about Twitter Commerce have now surfaced, showing a potential user flow for customers buying directly from Twitter.

The company has partnered with Fancy.com (online catalogue / Pinterest for buyers) AND Stripe (web and mobile payments) to provide merchants with the option to sell on its social network. The link between Twitter and Fancy is obviously Mr. Jack Dorsey, Twitter (somehow) co-founder and member of the board for Fancy.com.

Twitter commerce user flow found on Fancy.com

Twitter commerce - Source: Re/Code.net

Twitter commerce – Source: Re/Code.net

Re/Code “found” some “documents on fancy.com, in a “unprotected” area. Italics mark some obvious skepticism with “finding the documents” (what- did they just type fancy.com/twitter-commerce?) .

Whereas the documents and their source is of little importance, the fact is the user flow looks great and seems beautifully integrated with Twitter. It even provides a package tracking app and same-day delivery options.

Unlike Twitter, Facebook notoriously killed the much-awaited f-commerce by ignoring the growing ecommerce trend and its own potential opportunities. Much more –  it then decreased organic reach through its platform for non paying customers, thus alienating potential f-commerce merchants.

Now that the playing field is leveled, Twitter may somehow turn out to be a spectacular and unexpected challenger to eBay and Amazon. It does have 645 million potential customers.

Ad-Supported Mac OS? It could have happened.

steve-jobsIt was 1999. Only three years have passed since Steve Jobs returned to Apple. Britney Spears was climbing the charts with “Baby one more time” and engineers at Apple were a few months into launching the Mac OS 9. They would dub it “The Best Internet Operating System Ever”. It was a visionary product and an awesome precursor to today’s Internet-enabled operating systems.

Unlike its direct competitor, Microsoft, Apple had a simpler way of shipping its operating systems. They would either come pre-installed on purchased computers or subjected to a standard $99 upgrade fee.

Steve Jobs thought he can get more users aboard if he somehow reached out to those yet unwilling to pay for the OS. Ken Segall, the man credited with naming the iMac , recalls how this happened, in his book Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple’s Success:

“[...] Steve provided some details about how the advertising would work. At systems start-up, the user would see a sixty-second commercial. This ad could be regularly changed via updates from Apple’s servers. Throughout the rest of the OS, ads would appear in places where they had the most relevance. For example, if the print dialogue box indicated that you were running low on printer ink, you might see an ad from Epson with a link to its store – so you could buy some ink right then and there”. 

The consensus was the main ad, the one running at systems start, would be a premium spot for top-knotch companies. Those Steve admired, say BMW and Nike. Once the ad started running , some system functions would be suspended so the user had to see the whole ad.

Apple engineers and staff were psyched about the idea and they loved the fact that such a new interface could let users try the OS and buy it whenever they felt like upgrading. Apple even registered the patent for this, listing Steve Jobs as the main inventor. Fortunately this system never went public and Apple went on to build its success and later on give out the Maverick OS upgrade for free, but that’s a story for another post.

Apple thought about it, Google and Amazon did it.

Apple was not the only company that thought about the ad-supported OS, but it was the first to seriously consider it.

For starters – like most smartphone users you’ve heard about Android. It’s the most popular mobile OS (or at least the most used). It’s free and it helps Google leverage on mobile ads. So much that it Google now takes in about half of all mobile ads revenue.

Google’s other venture into ad-supported OS is Chrome OS / Chromium OS – the web OS that has Google at its center. And Google’s Ads.

Yeah, both Google and Apple thought about an ad-supported OS. The time-frame, however, is pretty important. Apple thought about the ad-supported OS, it nearly implemented it and ditched it. An year later (2000) Google launches AdWords. After yet another 5 years (2005) Google buys Android. 6 more years passed until Google launched its Chromebooks in 2011.

Amazon, the king of online retail, thought this is a great idea also.It started using it on its Kindle readers in 2011. Later on the Kindle Fire was subsidized through ads. The ad-supported device / OS seemed so good that Amazon didn’t actually bothered to built no-ads versions. Or talk about it.

Apple’s “say no” culture lead to dumping the ad-supported Mac OS

Fortunately Apple scraped the idea and later on figured out an way to give the Mac OS for free (it’s doing pretty well selling apps and music). Its focus on delivering a great user experience finally won. It was Probably Steve Jobs who remembered his own words, spoken at the 1997 Apple World Developers Conference:

“Innovation is saying no to a thousand things”

Flipboard Becomes an Ecommerce Gateway with its New Catalogue Feature

flipboard

 

Flipboard, famous for making it easy to read webclips and magazines on mobile devices, flips over to ecommerce. In a recent blog post the team announced it will allow brands and users to create virtual product catalogues.

For starters the company allows users to flip through curated content with v-magazines such as “Modern Man,” “Beauty Bar,” “Home Sweet Home,” “The Pantry” and “The Active-ist”.

Several brands have also taken up the opportunity and have launched brand magazines. The thing is – these magazines allow users to browse through holidays offers and than shop. It’s safe to assume that Flipboard aims at something more than just content browsing.

Right now the company has enlisted Banana Republic, Birchbox, eBay, Etsy, Fab and Levi’s. Soon others will  join given the fact that Flipboard has more than 85 million users (a rather interesting market), with 1 million of them actively creating and curating magazines.

Flipboard closing into Pinterest

Remember when we talked about how Pinterest is killing it in terms of ecommerce referral traffic? It seems that Flipboard has also taken up the model and lets users collect products using this handy-dandy little bookmarklet that allows users to collect and share their favorite products.

A mobile commerce gateway to lovable goods

Flipboard is one of the most popular mobile apps around  and not just in terms of number of users. Its 1 million personalized magazines has led to change in user behavior. Almost 50% of all users now read personalized magazines created by less than 1%. The time stamps are interesting also: most reading is done in the morning (9 AM – kinda like a morning newspaper), magazine updating is done in the afternoon and most sharing is done in the evening.

So far their unpaid editors were not able to make an actual living curating the magazines but who knows – The new commercial magazines might change the way we look at Flipboard.

With over 1 million editors, 85 million users and a lot of nice products out there Flipboard can maybe become the mobile Pinterest. There is a need for socially curated ecommerce stores, Pinterest is a success so far in terms of ecommerce interest and mobile is on the rise. Say hello to the new Ecommerce Gateway.

The 7 Most Important Components of an Ecommerce Business … that are usually ignored

When it comes to ecommerce most of the information you’ll be able to find online is marketing related. Because marketing is the easy part. That’s why almost everybody assumes that all it takes to build an ecommerce operation is good marketing, a technological sound shopping catalogue solution and a lot of luck.

Marketing and frontend ecommerce solutions are just the tip of the iceberg and in this post I’ll walk you through the most important areas you need to focus on (and you probably don’t) when building an online commerce business. Not site, not catalogue, business.

ecommerce-iceberg

What does it take to build a great online store?

No successful store was ever built on luck and marketing alone. Top online retailers got where they are selling great products at great prices, delivering fast and making sure that customers are well rewarded for their choice. That takes a lot of work in areas most of us never notice, areas such as:

1. Suppliers and supply chain management

You are or plan to be a retailer in an increasingly competitive market. It means a lot to come up with a great idea, drive good traffic and convert it to sales but you can’t do that without the right products, delivered at the right time, with a price the market is willing to pay.

Suppliers meant a whole lot when ecommerce was not around. Now – even more so. When it comes to ecommerce, suppliers can provide you with the right merchandise but they can also take the stocks burden off your shoulders. Amazon, for example, relies heavily on its marketplace partners to increase listed products number, without buying stocks for those products.

Key take away: before starting an ecommerce operation make sure:

  • you have enough and the right merchandise suppliers
  • they are financially and operational safe
  • they are able to provide real-time stock inventory
  • they are able to deliver purchased products fast

[Read more Supply Chain Management in Omnichannel Retail]

2. Warehouse operations

Post brick-and-mortar retail relies on electronic communication and product display. But when a product is bought it has to come from somewhere, right? Seal the deal with the suppliers and it’s off to the Warehouse, that magical place where online retailers pick products from the shelf, pack them neatly and prepare those products to be delivered.

Sounds simple? Well, usually, it is not. A decent store with its own warehouse operations has thousands of products at any time on its inventory, employs at least a couple of dozens of people to store products, pick and pack, and prepare for delivery. That’s why so many large companies choose to outsource their fulfillment operations to “third party logistics” suppliers such as Anchor 3PL or the ever-growing Fulfillment by Amazon so they can focus on what they do best (usually purchase the best assortment of merchandise, service customers and marketing).

Key Take Aways: A much larger post regarding 3PL/YPL (third party logistics) will soon be available on Netonomy.NET but until then, let’s have a look at things to consider when developing your own warehouse operations:

  • technology is the key – all 3PL service providers use technology (warehouse management systems) to know at all times where the products are, what’s the most efficient way to pick those products, who should be the person in charge for each package and others
  • think about the season – some seasons (such as the Holidays) are more operationally intensive then others. Be ready to employ temporary workforce to fulfill your orders
  • everything needs to be tracked and monitored – security and accountability are the key to handling large numbers of orders and workforce

3. Shipping and returns

Just as mentioned above your merchandise may be displayed and marketed online but it has to be packed and reach its destination in the real world. That’s why you need a good warehouse management and that’s why you need a great shipping service.

Shipping is usually an outsourced service. The best thing to do, unless you’re swimming in cash and you want to start competing the likes of FedEx and DHL, is employ one of the shipping providers and negotiate your way to a marketable shipping cost. Such a cost is likely to be, in the future, one you will be paying yourself – so pay attention.

Once you’ve contracted these shipping providers integrate their system with yours so you can streamline packaging and delivery.

Once in a while customers do not like what they’ve bought. You will need to handle the returns and reimburse customers for their purchase. Here you can team up with the shipping provider but your store has to handle all the communication.

Key take aways:

  • hire a shipping provider – It’s probably not worth it to have a shipping service of your own
  • pay attention to systems integrations when it comes to online store – warehouse – shipping flow
  • handle your returns as gracefully as possible – it may mean the difference between an unsatisfied customer and a lifetime brand ambassador

Before we skip to the next component I just wanted to make sure you’ve noticed I haven’t yet mentioned anything you would expect would be ecommerce related or innovative. So far – it’s just plain ol’ supply chain management and logistics. Got it? Great. Let’s move on to …

4. Client Relationship Management (CRM) – software and policies

Before even considering selling – you need to think about how are you going to treat your customer and keep him coming back. That’s where CRM comes in. While the term is usually used to describe a type of software, it is actually the term describing the whole policy on how are you going to handle interactions between you and your customer.

CRM needs to be “customer-centric”. Big words – but what do they mean? It just means that everything you do needs to be done “for the customer, by the retailer”. You need to understand the customer purchase patterns so you can recommend the most suited products. You need to record purchases, interests, preferred channels and basically all there is to it when it comes to understanding your customer.

Then act on that – after you’ve analyzed data make sure customer care, warehouse operations, shipping providers and even your purchase operations – all know who the customer is and what it wants.

Key Take Aways:

  • CRM is not just software – it’s a company policy on how to treat clients
  • Profiling is a must – understand as much as possible about your customer so you can serve better
  • “Customer-centric” is not a buzz-word – it’s common sense
  • There is no “client service department” – everybody working in an ecommerce store needs to know who the client is, record interactions and treat customers accordingly

5. Ecommerce catalogue and product display

Here’s one you surely expected, maybe not so down the list: your online store catalogue. Of course – this one is important. Without one we would be back to mail orders and inventing the wheel. However, as you’ve probably seen so far – it is just a small part of the whole ecommerce store business.

When it comes to it some things you really should be taking into account:

  • make sure you don’t over-design your store – your products are the most important items. Make them shine.
  • analyze and predict: predictive analytics is the practice of analyzing users behavior and predicting what would they rather buy at any given time. Read more about it here.
  • search, search and let’s not forget search: most of your customers will be using a search engine to navigate to your store (1) . Make sure your store is optimized. Once there, when in doubt, they will want to search for products (2) – make sure your site search works. Finally – when their order was shipped they will want to search for its location (3). Show them.

6. Marketing and loyalty programs

I know, i know – one includes the other. But for the sake of the argument let’s just assume that maybe loyalty programs online are so important that they should be a separate item to marketing. Because they are.

Loyalty is really hard to acquire these days. Especially when it comes to ecommerce. Most users will be searching for the lowest price and buy from whomever the seller is. But you can fight the trend with loyalty programs such as:

  • rewarding purchases – reward your users with points they can spend on your store. It’s really effective in keeping your customers tied to your brand, as well as making them feel great about it
  • social shopping – make your customer feel like a king when he can give out discounts and freebies to its peers and friends
  • reward social media – most online users have some kind of influence in their micro community of friends. Encourage them to take part in your story, share your products and reward them with freebies, discounts and … well …sometimes “Thank you” is enough

As for marketing at large – there is an increasing number of marketing solutions you an use to market your products and store but not all are alike. Not all are as efficient. Focus on:

  • Search engine optimization and paid search results
  • Email marketing
  • Social media
  • Branding

They may not look like much but together the “incredible four of ecommerce” can mean the difference between a failed startup and the next Amazon.

Last but not least …

7. Showroom and offline purchases

What – you thought that brick and mortar is all gone? Of course not. Online retail is still at just 7% of total retail but growing fast. One of the things that’s helping it grow is showrooming. That is the practice of checking a product in-store and buying it (usually cheaper) – online.

Don’t think about ecommerce as online-vs-offline. Think in terms of customer. The customer wants to feel the product before it makes the purchase. So you’ll need to show it to him. Even a small offline showroom can work miracles for your online store.

So now you have it – online retail is a rather big iceberg. Most of it unseen. Check where others don’t look because that’s where you’ll find success in ecommerce.

An Ecommerce Guide to Improve Holiday Sales

santa-claus

The holidays are coming and for most online retailers ’tis the season to be jolly. With shoppers starting their Christmas purchases as early as september, the holidays season starts earlier for those that really want to take advantage of this opportunity.

When to expect sales? Source: ICSC Spending Survey

When to expect sales? Source: ICSC Spending Survey

Most retailers expect 20-40% of their yearly sales to happen during holidays. Here are some things you should keep in check to insure optimum online store performance and increased sales:

1. Check your suppliers and stocks

It would be quite unfortunate if your sales would increase tenfold and yet you could not ship in time for everyone to get their presents. Say Little Timmy was due to receive a brand new toy but you can only deliver on the 27th of December. Too late.

Even worse – say you have one bestseller your pushing out there on the market and demand is so big that you’re left with no stocks after Black Friday?

These things and many others can happen and can leave a big impression on your sales, profits and customer retention so make sure you check your supply chain for any problems. Here is a brief list you should have in mind when preparing for the holidays:

Check your stocks inventory and your main suppliers

Have a look at last year’s analytics and see what products were most likely to convert users into buyers. Round up the total sales per product and increase that figure so you make sure you’ll be ready to supply the demand.

After you’ve optimized your inventory – make sure the supplier won’t bail out on you if you’ll still run out of stock. You never know when you’ll get your big hit.

Have clear commitments from your shipping supplier

Everyone will expect their purchases  delivered by the 25th of December. If you can’t fulfill that – you’re likely to lose a lot of customers. As such – make sure your shipping supplier is ready to deliver on time. Push for shorter delivery terms. After you’re done with that you should also…

Be ready for a lot more pick and packing

Remember – the objective is fast delivery. The fact that the shipping supplier delivers the next day may be useless if it takes you 5 days to pick (or order) and pack an order.

The Holidays will likely increase activity in the warehouse so make sure your fulfillment team is ready to handle a lot more work than it’s used to. If not, scale up temporarily. Can’t scale up? You can outsource your fulfillment operations to a third party logistics (TPL) supplier such as Fulfillment by Amazon.

2. Holiday marketing starts in september

Of course – that doesn’t mean you have to post Santa Claus pictures, snowflakes and Christmas Carols on your Facebook page but being prepared long before your competition can work out miracles. Here are some things you should get ready for, things that usually take quite a lot of time to prepare:

Sell Christmas Bundles  to insure up-sell

Great products need less marketing and bundles are great ways to insure your customer feels he’s getting more for the buck. Your best-selling products are usually bought with other smaller accessories. You can find out which are these by having a look at last year’s purchases and analytics.

Have a look at what people bought and how they bought it. Try to look for patterns in these purchases but don’t stop there. If you see that customers bought an Xbox, two extra controllers (one to play with and one to replace the one they’ve previously smashed against the wall) and the latest GTA – make it a bundle. Go beyond that and bundle up for a Playstation gift.

It’s hard to pick presents. Make sure you offer Gift Cards

Remember that ” ’tis the season to be happy ” part at the beginning? Well – turns out that’s kind of a lie. People feel depressed and anxious during holidays. Among the reasons – media overload, crowded places and a pressure to find appropriate gifts for those they hold dear.

Of course you can’t shut down the media overload but an online store is a great place to avoid the crowd and a gift card can be the perfect gift for anyone. Have a look at what customers are preparing to buy as Christmas gifts:

• Gift Cards: 59%
• Electronics (ex: TV, Computer, iPad/Apple products): 38%
• Apparel: 35%

Gift cards are not a maybe – they’re a must.

Improve your search ratings and email database BEFORE Holidays

How will you get customers to your site? Of course – they are buying, but are they buying from YOU? If you’ve planned to increase your sales during the Holidays you can be sure you’re not the only one. However – you can improve your results by:

  1. Improve your listings in search results: there aren’t many things you can “quickly do” (heard this like a bazzzilion times) but there are some, as long as you have a fairly decent search engine positioning:
    1. Check for lack of content – some of your products may not have an appropriate description or may not have a description at all, the title may be missing or misleading. If you’re new to this, a great place to start is Moz’s Begginer’s Guide to SEO.
    2. Structured data goes a long way when you go head to head against your competitors. Showing data regarding product prices, ratings etc. directly in search results can be the difference between a sale and an user that doesn’t bother to click on your link. Better have a developer include Schema.org structured data but if you’re curious to what this means – check out the “getting started” area on Schema.org.
  2. Increase your email subscribers database: Offer discount, vouchers, products – anything really but get those people to signup to your newsletter, before the holidays. When it comes to sales during holidays, a fairly targeted, permission based newsletter can do a lot more in terms of sales than your usual display or facebook ad.
  3. pinterest-drives-ecommerceImprove your Pinterest page – people on Pinterest like to buy stuff. That’s why they browse. Here are a couple of stats (you can read more about it here) that will make you WANT to improve your Pinterest presence:
    1. Pinterest drives 41% of ecommerce traffic, 4% more than Facebook
    2. Pinterest users are big spenders – at $80.54 average value per referred customer, Pinterest is doing better than Facebook ($71.26) and Twitter ($70.17)

Make sure your Store stays open through the traffic flood

Your Black Friday program will likely increase traffic by more than 800% . Most online retailers have an larger increase and the trend just gets better by the year. That means that in order to have your store open during the surge in traffic you should:

  • move your store into the cloud so you can easily upgrade used resources when needed. Don’t know what “cloud infrastructure” means? You should definitely catch up with IT reading because these things are not IT – only territory, anymore.
  • increase call center operators if you have a support line (hint: you should have one)
  • focus mostly on client service and less on marketing when the holidays are actually there. Client service sells, marketing just drives people in the store.

This short guide covers some of the most important basics. If these areas are fully covered – you should do fine during the holidays but make sure you come back to Netonomy.NET for more information.

Pinterest Ads: Who Needs Them Most?

Pinterest has been growing steadily for the past year and some think of it as a possible competitor to Facebook’s social media turf. That means they do very well in the growth department.

Pinteresting Ads - source: Pinterest Blog

Pinteresting Ads – source: Pinterest Blog

Money isn’t a problem either (at least not for now), as Pinterest is slowly digging through $200 million in funding, but it still has to come up with a monetizing plan.

Pinterest growth rate decreasing in the US, increasing worldwide.

Pinterest growth rate decreasing in the US, increasing worldwide.

Last year’s try with Skimlinks probably looked great in a board meeting pitch but it caused quite a stir when word got out that Pinterest was changing it’s users’ links into Skimlinks affiliate leads. The company was accused of making money of its user generated content (which everyone understood, as … you know … servers cost money), without their consent or an explicit disclosure (which seemed to be not so easy to understand).

That was definitely a failed attempt at monetizing Pinterest’s growing userbase and they seemed to have learnt a lot from that. In the post announcing the new feature CEO Ben Silbermann promises ads will be:

  • Tasteful. No flashy banners or pop-up ads.
  • Transparent. We’ll always let you know if someone paid for what you see, or where you see it.
  • Relevant. These pins should be about stuff you’re actually interested in, like a delicious recipe, or a jacket that’s your style.
  • Improved based on your feedback. Keep letting us know what you think, and we’ll keep working to make things better.”

Pinterest Ads are great news for Ecommerce

pinterest-drives-ecommercePinterest is first of all popular. Not just in the US. All over the world. Users devote time into building, curating and browsing through handpicked photos of products, dreamy locations, fashion photos and many many others. Most things people collect and see pinned onto their boards do have one thing in common – they can be bought. And boy does it show:

  1. Pinterest drives 41% of ecommerce traffic, 4% more than Facebook
  2. Pinterest users are big spenders – at $80.54 average value per referred customer, Pinterest is doing better than Facebook ($71.26) and Twitter ($70.17)

All in all – Pinterest is the biggest social player when it comes driving relevant (and by that I mean paying) traffic to online stores.Yet not all industries are equal – some will benefit more than others when using Pinterest Ads.

Which are the categories that will benefit most from Pinterest ads, in terms of ecommerce sales?

You are probably guessing the leading industry but first here are the runners-up:

3. Travel

Travel pins account for only 2.5% off all pins but don’t let that small percent fool you. Pins get shared and in an industry where everything is judged by the numbers it helps improving your margin with a little thing called emotion.

Pinterest is great at instilling positive emotions and shifting purchase options towards recommended / shared locations. While it it was hardly worth the trouble to orchestrate a social media campaign that gets some kind of traffic rolling now everything will get easier with sponsored pins.

2. Home deco / home lifestyle

Home is the most popular category on Pinterest, with 17.2% of all pins categorized as home items. Not surprisingly either: 80% of all Pinterest users are women, more inclined to look into home lifestyle items and 50% of them have kids.

With an annual household income of over $100 000 or more for 28.1 % of Pinterest users, you can be sure that this is the place where you can market home related items. Brands such as Crane & Canopy actively engage Pinterest users and draw new products inspiration from the things they see trending on the social network.

1. Fashion

The big winner is of course Fashion, for both men and women. When it comes to style, beauty and clothing, 11.7% of all pins are pinned under Fashion and those pins usually come from popular users, influencers and fashion media outlets and bloggers.

Think the previous numbers are pinteresting? Well get this – Sephora’s Pinterest users spend 15 times more than their Facebook counterparts.

Sephora’s Julie Bernstein is unforgiving when it comes to Pinterest vs Facebook:

“The reality is that when you’re in the Pinterest mindset, you’re actually interested in acquiring items, which is not what people go to Facebook for,” Bornstein said. “Facebook continues to be just a great customer interaction tool that gives us the real-time ability to dialog with our customer; it’s a big customer-service venue for us.”

There’s no denying that Pinterest is here to stay when it comes to online retail. It probably helps to be pinning even if you’re not dealing into Fashion, Home or Travel as pinners are buyers. But if you are selling these products  then Pinterest Ads, a great addition to your Pinterest marketing policy, will probably bring a great deal of new customers to your business.

Selling and Marketing Cars Online – 5 Most Important Trends

People may not be (yet) buying new cars online but they sure spend a lot of time and energy researching their future purchases online. Remember the old cars salesman stereotype? Forget it. The new cars salesmen is the guy with the most positive online reviews, a stellar social media presence, hired by the friendliest dealership in town and quick to respond to his customers’ questions.

new-cars-online-stats1. Car buyers are in the market for 5.3 months. Mostly researching online.

Speaking of customers – those looking into buying a new car are in the market for roughly 5.3 months, as shown in this Cars.com research. During these months they check out:

  • information regarding manufacturers
  • information on car models
  • dealership information

Now when it comes to dealerships – you can be sure that by the time a customer sets foot in one he has probably read everything available online on:

  • company website
  • social media profiles
  • online reviews

Sometimes potential customers don’t even bother visiting their local dealerships if online reviews are not good enough. A curated online presence can do miracles for dealers as long as their service matches their marketing. Good service and reliability are still the most important factors when deciding what and where to buy. Recent online developments just make it easy for customers to find out the good and the bad about dealers and cars.

2. Photos sell cars. Reliable cars.

decision-to-buy-carWe all know how important photos are when buying cars. 63% of potential car buyers make their first steps towards a purchasing decision based on photos and other media. However, no dealer is going to make them pay unless esthetics are backed up by great reviews on reliability (52% new car buyers showed interest), features/colors (51%) and safety information (49%).

3. Mobile is used before, while and after purchasing a car

As mobile is quickly revolutionizing every aspect of our lives we were bound to use them on the spot, in dealerships, when making our final decisions. If you’ve used your smartphone in the dealership you can rest assured you are not alone – 43% of customers visiting dealers use their mobile device. Most frequent uses during dealership visits are targeted at:

  • pricing information (57%)
  • general information (22%)
  • vehicle information (14%)

So price checking really matters when visiting the dealer. It’s not a secret that any dealership will try to maximize its margin but that seems to be harder and harder with everconnected consumers.

Much more than this – customers will also check for user generated content on the spot. 79% of new car buyers value user generated reviews , as this CapGemini report shows.

The same report outlines some of the media channels buyers will scan to form an opinion. The big take away from the info below is that social media outlets (for both manufacturers and dealers) really matter when forming an opinion. Make sure that they are well set up and properly maintained.

infomation-checking

4. Customers connect to connected cars

options-connected-cars

Connected users need connected cars

There is a growing need for connected cars. I wrote about it a couple of months ago and now, with the new iOS 7 and recent developments in smartphone manufacturing customers seem to be getting what they want, when it comes to in-car smartphone support:

  • driving support
  • care information
  • remote support
  • communication
  • vehicle information

5. Women feel empowered when it comes to buying cars online

A big shift in car buying, especially when it comes to online-related purchases is the fact that women seem to be more and more engaged.

What has been looked at as a traditionally male influenced industry is shifting by the day and internet plays a large part in this shift. Women are big spenders when it comes to auto: they spend more than $200 billion yearly on new cars and car – care. They also influence over 80% of all new car purchases and account for almost 65% of all car service work done on dealerships.

These are some really, really big numbers and they just keep on increasing as women feel empowered to negotiate their prices behind a computer screen. Once a somewhat biased industry, the auto dealerships are leveled fields for both men and women and purchasing can now be fun and engaging for women. Feel like reading a little more about it? Check out Libby Copeland’s experience with buying a car online here.

In the end remember that:

  1. customers will research online their car options long before visiting a car dealership
  2. dealerships are (still) the ones to finalize the car sale
  3. unreliable car salesmen will soon be a thing of the past
  4. mobile is changing the way we buy cars
  5. women are quickly becoming the most important segment in car sales

 

 

Showrooming and The Future of Retail

Brick-and-Mortar retailers are in trouble with online retail becoming mainstream. A signifiant part of that trouble are customers testing or trying on the merchandise and than buying it online, cheaper. It may not be the end of brick store but showrooming is a sign that we are witnessing a new chapter in the bricks vs clicks story. Possibly – even more.

What is Showrooming?

showroomingSimply put Showrooming is the practice of checking merchandise in store and than purchasing it online, usually cheaper. Although the practice has been around ever since online stores became competitive in terms of prices (past decade), things started moving a little faster now that smartphones allow in-store price checking. Customers can go to the closest store, try the product they want to purchase and than research prices online. Amazon even has a special app for that.

That’s obviously frustrating for store owners. They setup the shop, pay invoices for rent, pay checks only to find customers passing through the store, checking out the merchandise and than buying it elsewhere. Shoppers, on the other hand, don’t really care if the store makes any money or not. They want to try the product (check!) and than purchasing it at the lowest price (check!).

When it comes to it, companies such as Amazon, Net-A-Porter or eBay, mostly online operations, are of course benefiting and even encouraging the trend. On the other hand traditionally offline retailers frown upon, helplessly,  and look for ways to counteract Showrooming.

There is great reason to do so as 69% shoppers look online for better prices and 47% look for free shipping, when checking products in-store.

Showrooming stats

Showrooming stats

There are ways for brick and mortar retailers to fight these trends at least in the short run, by:

  • offering to price match their online competitors
  • increase customer retention by creating loyalty programs
  • develop online operations to increase market reach and decrease product costs, therefore harnessing the Showroomin trend

If you’re a classic retailer you should note that these are only temporary solutions because…

Showrooming will eventually turn stores into showrooms

On the long run physical stores will probably become obsolete. A recent study by Paris-based Capgemini shows that:

  • most offline stores are expected to become obsolete in their present form, and will be replaced by actual showrooms by 2020
  • when that happens, shops will actually sell more, as 56% of digital-enabled shoppers spend more when they first research the product they want online
  • 73% of shoppers expect online prices to be lower

There will be no “brick and mortar”-only retailers

The Boyer, Hensinger & Kleppinger General store, now a part of history.

The Boyer, Hensinger & Kleppinger General store, now a part of history.

Retailers tend to focus on the practice of showrooming, but there’s a larger picture of a rapidly changing reality. It’s not this practice they should be focusing on but rather the changing landscape of multichannel shopping. There is nothing mystic about online retail’s rise: it’s just that customers get more products for less money.

Expensive operations as brick and mortar stores, hardly manageable teams that usually harm retailers’ brands and many, many other overheads all add up to a tectonic shift in traditional commerce. Offline-only retailers are a thing of the past. They can ignore the trends, they can fight them but sooner or later they too will be transformed, just like the traditional media juggernaut.

Ecommerce cuts out the middle men

As far as historical records go, commerce has been a traditionally multi-level industry. There were those that produced the goods, the big buyers, the carriers, the retailers, the marketers, all adding up to the costs. When globalization came into effect that became even more so.

Say you wanted to develop and sell a computer. You had those handling raw materials, processing them, the assembly line, the shipping company, transport, distributers, retailers. Not to mention everyone in R&D, accounting and all those other XXI century white collar jobs. Just a glance shows a very, very long line between development and actually delivering the product to its end user.

All along this line, everyone adds costs. In the end the one that pays for these costs is the consumer.

No some companies thought they can do more with customers paying less and such was the case when Dell decided they will be shipping their customized products to those ordering online, when Apple decided they will just go ahead and open their own Flagship store and also let users purchase online, when Amazon built a bridge between writers and book-buyers – they were all just cutting out the middle man.

Startups are slashing through middle men

Outstanding design and materials to Warby Parker eyewear

Outstanding design and materials to Warby Parker eyewear

You think that’s just a timely thing? Here’s a list of startups that are slashing merciless through middle men with the power of ecommerce:

  1. Founders of Warby Parker showed they can slash prices on premium eyewear by cutting out designers, brands, wholesalers and retailers. From just 1% online buy rate for glasses they now expect the industry to deliver almost 15% in the next year. They managed to do that by letting customers receive home 5 pairs, for 5 days, so people can try them on, ask their friends what they think about them and than return 4 back without any charge.
  2. Seasonal collections? Screw that, Crane & Canopy releases new high quality duvets each week based on Pinterest and social media trends. They do that by connecting premium factories to end buyers. They cut out the wholesalers, retailers and premium designers.
  3. Similarly, Bonobos started when Stanford B-School students Brian Spaly and Andy Dunn decided they want to start a new business, met with a taylor and figured they can make affordable fitted clothing for men. Soon enough they were raising $16.5 million in venture capital and the business really took off.
Bonobos founders Brian Spaly and Andy Dunn

Bonobos founders Brian Spaly and Andy Dunn

These are rather small startups but if you remember no more than 30 years ago – there was no Apple. 15 years ago – there was no Amazon.  10 years ago we had no Facebook. Personal computing and music, books, communication an media – all industries that had been radically and irreversibly been changed by these rather young companies, driven by the amazing change the Internet is.

We now know retail is changing. With it – our whole society. The outcome is hard to predict but the signs are here. Small and mundane as it might seem, showrooming is one of those signs.